International Wild Hunting

5/5 Stars - 5 Reviews
Barcelona, Catalonia Hunting Guide

Welcome to Spain, a magnificent hunting destination in many ways.
Here you will be able to enjoy hunting, some of the world`s most unique species of Ibex (Ronda, South Eastern, Beceite and Gredos) as well as other especies which can only be found in Spain.

Unique hunts such a Spanish Monteria, Red Legged shoots can also be organized.
We look forward to sharing your next adventure with you.
International Wild Hunting Guide
International Wild Hunting

Hunting Trips

CANTABRIAN CHAMOIS
1 person
(male) Shoulder height about 28 inches (71 cm). Weight 45-75 pounds (20-34 kg). The smallest chamois, with the lightest coloration. Summer coat is reddish, turning brown in winter. Underparts are pale. Rump, throat, lower jaw and front of face are yellowish. Smaller and paler than the Pyrenean chamois and with shorter, slimmer horns. DISTRIBUTION Cantabrian Mountains of northwestern Spain. STATUS Stable, with numbers estimated at 15,000 in 1981. Hunting Season: May to 15th July / September to November.
SOUTHEASTERN IBEX
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The southeastern Spanish ibex is one of three categories established for record-keeping purposes by splitting Mediterranean ibex (subspecies hispanica) into geographical groups based on horn size and shape. (The other two are Beceite ibex and Ronda ibex.) DESCRIPTION Smaller and lighter in color than the Beceite and Gredos types, but larger and darker than the Ronda type. Horn size and shape vary considerably from place to place, with those from the Sierra Nevada generally the largest. Horns from Tejada-Almijara tend to be the most distinctive, forming a circle with the tips growing toward the neck like those of a mouflon. The keel is smooth, making the horns almost round in cross-section. DISTRIBUTION The mountains and reserves of Tejada, Almijara, Sierra Nevada, Lujar, Cazorla, and Muela de Cortes in southeastern Spain.
RONDA IBEX
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The Ronda ibex is one of three categories established for record-keeping purposes by splitting Mediterranean ibex (subspecieshispanica) into geographical groups based on horn size and shape. (The other two are Beceite ibex and southeastern Spanish ibex.) DESCRIPTION The smallest type of Spanish ibex with the smallest horns. Overall color is a light brown. The horns resemble those of an Alpine ibex, typically growing upward in a V-shape, then backward with a spiral turn of only 90 degrees. Horn thickness is constant for half the length, then decreases gradually to the broomed tips. While this is the typical Ronda horn conformation, other horn shapes may be found in this region and even in the same herd. DISTRIBUTION Ronda Mountains in extreme southern Spain.
IBERIAN MOUFLON
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DESCRIPTION (male) Shoulder height 26-30 inches (66-76 cm). Weight 70-100 pounds (32-45 kg). Females are a little smaller. One of the world’s smallest wild sheep, resembling a slim domestic sheep except that it has a normal coat of hair, any wool being concealed beneath. Upper parts are reddish-brown with a pale (almost white) saddle patch in the winter coat. Underparts, rump, lower legs and muzzle are white. There is dark neck ruff but no bib. The horns usually grow in a tight circle, with the tips turned inward toward the face and broomed back to about a three-quarter curl. In a purebred European mouflon, the tip-to-tip spread should not be the widest spread. Females sometimes grow small horns, but usually do not. BEHAVIOR Gregarious. Females with young form year-round flocks; mature males have separate flocks. During the mating season in October-November, individual males join the females after battling for dominance. Lambs (usually one, sometimes twins) are born five months later. Females are sexually mature when less than one year old. Mainly a grazer, but browses to an extent. Feeds largely at night, resting by day in thick cover. Vision and hearing are excellent, sense of smell less so. A good runner. Alert and wary where hunted, and has good learning ability. HABITAT Steep, wooded mountains near the treeline on Corsica and Sardinia. Has adapted to woodlands and meadows where introduced on the European mainland. DISTRIBUTION Andorra,Spain and Portugal Outside Europe, European mouflons have been introduced, both on private properties and in the wild, in the conterminous United States and in Argentina. Also on the islands of Lanai and Hawaii in the North Pacific Ocean, and the Kergulen Islands in the Indian Ocean. TAXONOMIC NOTES Scientists do not agree on the origin of the European mouflon. Some regard it is as the ancestor of the domestic sheep, others as a feral descendant from domestic sheep. Traditionally it has been regarded as indigenous to Corsica and Sardinia, and from there introduced on the European mainland and elsewhere. However, some authorities now believe it is descended from domestic sheep transplanted to Corsica and Sardinia by humans thousands of years ago. Interestingly, the existence of wild sheep on Corsica and Sardinia was apparently unknown to Linnaeus, for they do not appear in his Systema Naturae, the work that is the starting point of zoological nomenclature. It was not until 1811 that German zoologist P.S. Pallas formally described them under the name Aegoceros musimon. The systematics of the European mouflon are controversial. Some authorities consider it a full species, Ovis musimon, others as a subspecies of Asian mouflon (either O. gmelini or O. orientalis), still others as a race of domestic sheep (O. aries) or even as a race of argali (O. ammon). We have elected to follow Valdez and Nadler, who treat all mouflons as a full species, O. gmelini, of which the European mouflon is a subspecies, O. g. musimon. In record-keeping, we treat all European populations as indigenous. STATUS Mouflons from Corsica and Sardinia, formerly considered endangered by the IUCN, have been upgraded to vulnerable. REMARKS The purebred mouflon, especially an old male with large horns, is a fine game animal that is difficult to hunt. It is the only sheep that is mainly nocturnal and lives in thick cover. The premier hunting period is during the October-November rut, at roughly the same time as fallow deer, which makes for a good combination. Good heads can be found throughout Europe but traditionally the best trophies have come from the Czech Republic, with Spain also producing some very good heads. There may be no such thing as a totally “pure” mouflon, because mouflons will cross with any other species of sheep (including domestic sheep) under certain conditions. Therefore, we apply the same morphological criteria for purebred mouflons in Europe as for introduced populations in North America and elsewhere. The mouflons whose measurements are recorded here are believed to be purebred.
WOLF
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Also called wolf or common wolf. The name “gray wolf” is used to differentiate it from the red wolf of North America, which is a different species, and the maned wolf of South America and extinct Falkland Island wolf, which are not really wolves. DESCRIPTION (male) Head and body length 3-5 feet (0.9-1.5 m). Tail length 13-20 inches (33-51 cm). Shoulder height 26-32 inches (66-81 cm). Weight 80-120 pounds (36-54 kg), sometimes considerably more. Females are about 20 percent smaller than males.The gray wolf is the largest wild member of the dog family and is the ancestor of the domestic dog. It resembles a large German shepherd dog, with its heavy frame, long legs, large feet and thick, bushy tail. The skull is especially large, with powerful jaws and large, well-developed, meat-eating teeth. Like most canids, it has 42 teeth (i3/3, c1/1, pm4/4, m2/3). The fur is moderately long and thick. The overall color varies from grayish-brown to yellowish-brown, and there may be a reddish tinge on the head, ears, shoulders and legs. Northern specimens tend to be large, gray and long-haired; southern ones are smaller, brown and short-haired. HABITAT Dense forests, open woodland and tundra. DISTRIBUTION At one time throughout the greater part of Europe including the British Isles. Now mainly in Russia, Romania and the former Yugoslavia, with lesser numbers in Finland, Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Greece, Italy, Spain and Portugal. A few survive in northern parts of Sweden and Norway.Outside Europe, the gray wolf is also found in Asia and North America.REMARKS Hunting the intelligent, wary wolf is difficult, and most are taken by chance encounter. Occasionally taken over bear bait or during drives for other species. European wolves have a reputation for being more aggressive toward humans than North American wolves. TAXONOMIC NOTES Dozens of subspecies have been described at different times, based mainly on color and size. The following are listed in Europe: deitanus (southeastern Spain), italicus (Italy), kurjak (former Yugoslavia), lupus (most of Europe) and signatus (central Spain). We do not separate them.
IBERIAN RED DEER
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Ciervo Hispánico (Sp), Spanischer Rothirsch (G), Cerf d’Espagne (F). DESCRIPTION A smaller race, with stags weighing 180-220 pounds (82-100 kg). Compared to the European red deer, the coat is not as thick and is somewhat lighter in color. Antlers are not as long or heavy, but are still very fine, sometimes with as many as 18-20 points (or even more) and a high incidence of crowning. HABITAT Deciduous forest and bush in highland areas. Also flat ,sandy scrubland in the Coto de Dona region of southwestern Spain. DISTRIBUTION Spain. There is also a small population in southeastern Portugal. REMARKS Spain is estimated to have 350,000 red deer, with hunting excellent. Most (about 35,000 a season) are taken during monterias, which are elaborate drives involving many beaters and dogs over prepared ground. This is the classic method, rich with tradition, that is favored by many Spanish hunters. However, opportunities for good trophies are better when individual stags are glassed and stalked, especially during the rut or “roar” in the second half of September.
CANTABRIAN CHAMOIS
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(male) Shoulder height about 28 inches (71 cm). Weight 45-75 pounds (20-34 kg). The smallest chamois, with the lightest coloration. Summer coat is reddish, turning brown in winter. Underparts are pale. Rump, throat, lower jaw and front of face are yellowish. Smaller and paler than the Pyrenean chamois and with shorter, slimmer horns. DISTRIBUTION Cantabrian Mountains of northwestern Spain. STATUS Stable, with numbers estimated at 15,000 in 1981. Hunting Season: May to 15th July / September to November.
PYRENEAN CHAMOIS
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Sarrio, isart (Sp), Pyrenäen Gams (G), Chamois des Pyrénées, Izard (F). DESCRIPTION (male) Shoulder height 29-30 inches (74-76 cm). Weight 55-90 pounds (25-41 kg). Summer coat is reddish, turning brown in winter. Underparts are pale. Rump, throat, lower jaw and front of face are yellowish. Larger and darker than the Cantabrian chamois, with longer, thicker horns. DISTRIBUTION Locally in the Pyrenees Mountains of northeastern Spain and southern France. STATUS Stable, with numbers estimated at 20,000 in 1981.
GREDOS IBEX
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After the Beceite ibex, the Gredos ibex is the largest and darkest in color and has the largest horns. Typically, the horns are lyre-shaped with a pronounced curve and a spiral turn of more than 180 degrees. Horn thickness decreases progressively from the base to the very thin tip. While this is the typical Gredos horn conformation, other horn shapes may be found in this region and even in the same herd. DISTRIBUTION Mountains in west-central Spain, especially the Gredos and Batuecas mountains.
BECEITE IBEX
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The Beceite ibex is one of three categories established for record-keeping purposes by splitting Mediterranean ibex (subspecieshispanica) into geographical groups based on horn size and shape. (The other two are southeastern Spanish ibex and Ronda ibex.) DESCRIPTION This is the largest and darkest type with the largest horns. Typically, the horns are straighter than in Gredos ibex and have a spiral turn of less than 180 degrees. Horn thickness remains constant for half the length, then decreases toward the tip, which is not as thin as in the Gredos race. While this is the typical Beceite horn conformation, other horn shapes may be found in this region and even in the same herd. DISTRIBUTION Mountains of Beceite and Tortosa in northeastern Spain.
SPANISH IBEX GRAND SLAM
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The great, unique and most desirable hunting trip in Spain that will let you collect the all 4 subspecies of Spanish ibex. For the ibex slam we normally plan 14 days, we will be driving throughout Spain. Its history, beauty, gastronomy, culture and the different landscapes that we will be passing through will make you enjoy the trip( it´s a gorgeous hunting & sightseeing combination trip), while driving from place to place in order to reach the all 4 ibex locations, for hunting them in their natural and native habitats. We recommend to come on the rutting time If you will add the 2 chamois ( Cantabrian & Pyrenean )to the ibex grand slam, you will collect 6 of the 12 Capra World Slam, as well as you could say you have done the Spanish Capra Slam.
FALLOW DEER
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“Fallow” is from the Old English fealu, meaning a light yellowish-brown color. Sometimes called common fallow deer to distinguish it from the endangered Persian fallow deer (D. mesopotamica) of Iran. DESCRIPTION (male) Shoulder height 36-43 inches (91-109 cm). Weight 140-220 pounds (64-100 kg), sometimes more. Females are smaller.Medium-sized, with more color variations than any other deer. The four principal ones are: (1) typical-summer coat of rich brown with white spots and lighter underparts, changing to dark gray-brown in winter with spots barely visible; (2) menil-pale fawn with white spots; (3) white (but not albino); and (4) black-not actually black, but very dark brown. There are many intermediate color variations. Antlers have brow and trez tines (bez tines are usually absent), and are well-palmated at the top, with a number of tines coming off the rear edge of the palmation.BEHAVIOR Social behavior varies: in some areas gregarious, with herds as large as 30, but in other areas more or less solitary. Herds usually led by does, although there does not seem to be a dominance hierarchy. Males establish small territories during the rut, when they bellow and grunt and do a good deal of fighting while gathering harems. Mating season is in October, with the (usually) single fawn born in the spring.Diurnal, with most activity early and late in the day. Essentially a grazer, but also browses shrubs and trees. Vision, hearing and sense of smell are good. When alarmed, gives a short “bark” and runs off with stiff-legged bounces that serve as a warning. Not as wary or shy as most other deer; can easily be semi-domesticated if given supplemental feed and not hunted. Very hardy, able to live in a wide range of climatic and environmental conditions, but some forest seems to be required. HABITAT Open woodland. DISTRIBUTION Most of Europe. Commonly kept in deer parks.It is known from fossils that fallow deer, or something very similar, lived in many parts of Europe during the Pleistocene Epoch, but most (if not all) of them died out during the last glaciation when ice covered most of Europe. Modern fallow deer are thought to have originated in the Mediterranean region of southern Europe, the island of Rhodes, and Anatolia (Asian Turkey). Introduced (or reintroduced?) in most parts of Europe by the Romans, or perhaps by the earlier Phoenicians. For record-keeping purposes, all fallow deer from Europe are considered indigenous.Also native to Asian parts of Turkey. Introduced in North and South America, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and some oceanic islands. Found in the wild in 38 countries on six continents. REMARKS For the best trophies, fallow deer should be hunted soon after the velvet is stripped, since tines are often broken off in fighting during the rut. The best antlers come from Denmark and Hungary, but other eastern European countries, and Spain, also produce good heads.
EUROPEAN ROE DEER
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Corzo Europeo (Sp),Europaischer Rehwild (G), Chevreuil d’Europe(F). Also called western roe deer or common roe deer. DESCRIPTION (male) Shoulder height 25-36 inches (64-92 cm). Weight 44-81 pounds (20-37 kg). Largest animals are found in eastern part of the species range. Females are about 20 percent smaller than males. The smallest and most elegant native deer in Europe. Coloration is rich reddish-brown in summer, with a gray face, white chin and black muzzle band. Rump patch is obscure. Winter coat is grayish-brown, with two white throat patches and a prominent white rump patch of erectile hairs that can expand under stress to form a large white disk. Tail is small and white, invisible against the rump. A few melanistic (blackish) roe deer occur in the Netherlands and northwestern Germany, but are rare elsewhere, as are other color variations such as black-faced, albino, black and white, and brown and white. Normal antlers of a mature buck consist of a main beam directed upward, with a lower forward tine and a higher rearward tine making three points to a side. (However, non-typical antlers with 4-5 points on a side are not uncommon.) Antlers have a very rough burr (coronet) around the base, and grow so closely together that the coronets usually touch in mature animals. The skull is broad, with a compressed muzzle. The female does not grow antlers, but occasionally will grow coronets without any antler growth. In winter, females grow a prominent anal tuft of long hair that may be mistaken for a tail. BEHAVIOR Usually solitary, but tends to form small groups in winter. During the rut in July and August, a buck will be with a single doe (unlike other deer species, which escort several) and will fight intruding males fiercely. The roe deer is the only deer species with delayed implantation, the fetal development not starting until December or January. Fawns (usually two, range is 1-3) are born in the spring. Normal lifespan in the wild is 10-12 years, with maximum about 17 years. Roe deer are delicate in captivity, surviving only an average of 3-1/2 years, with seven years the longest recorded. Both a browser and a grazer. Active mainly at night, spending the day in cover. Senses are well developed. Excellent swimmer. Shy but curious. Both sexes have a doglike bark when alarmed. The female makes a whistling noise during mating season and to call her fawns. HABITAT Varied. Usually woodland, especially with openings or low vegetation. Also open moors, grasslands and alpine meadows. DISTRIBUTION Generally throughout Europe, except absent from Ireland, central England, the far north, most of Portugal, and the Mediterranean islands. Found as far east as the Don River in Russia, and perhaps even as far as the Volga River. European roe deer are also found in southwestern Asia, where they occur on the southern slopes of the Caucasus Mountains, in Anatolia (Asian Turkey), the northern tip of Iraq, and northern Iran. TAXONOMIC NOTES Several subspecies have been listed, including capreolus, transsylvanicus, canus and whittali (all Europe), armenius (Anatolia), and coxi (headwaters of the Tigris River in northern Iraq). We do not separate them. STATUS European roe deer have adapted well to civilization, with numbers increasing and range expanding. About 500,000 are harvested each year in Germany alone, with the population remaining stable. REMARKS The roe deer is Europe’s most common and popular big game animal. A really good roe deer head is probably valued as much among Europeans as any other European trophy. Best time to find an outstanding head is during the rut in late July and early August; however, in areas where high crops are grown, early May can be better, because later on the growth is too high for these small deer to be seen. Best time for a prime cape is June-August. The bucks start to shed their antlers in November. The best trophies are taken in eastern Europe, Britain and Sweden. A large caliber is not needed for these small animals, those in the .243 class being just about right.
BALEAREAN GOAT
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Capra aegagrus Erxleben, 1777 Cabra mallorquina (Sp) Boc Balear (Catalàn) Mallorca Ziege (G) Majorcan agrimi (British English) Chevre Balear (F) Balearean Goat (American English) The oldest remains of this species have been dated to 2030 B.C. by archeologists that have studied the fauna of the Mediterranean Sea. The Balearean Goat is indigenous to the Balearean Island of Mallorca. These animals are completely wild, the biggest threat to their existence being the cross-breeding with domestic livestock. DESCRIPTION (male) Shoulder height about 28 inches ( 71 cm ), average weight is 100-110 pounds (45-50 kg). Females are smaller. The Balearean Goat browses on leaves, twigs and weeds and are therefore highly destructive feeders. Able to climb trees and feed in the branches. They are diurnal and all senses are good. DISTRIBUTION Island of Mallorca, one of the Balearean Islands in the Mediterranean Sea. There mainly on the entire west coast and north-west in the Sierra de Tramuntana and the Formentor, Alcudia and Artá Peninsulas. WARNING TO HUNTERS on the island, one can also find introduced Feral Goat; the coats of these animals usually show three or more colors in a spotted pattern. Only goats depicting the clear “black cross over reddish brown coat” will be accepted as Balearean Goat by SCI. Or put differently: not every goat hunted in Mallorca is automatically a Balearean Goat.
RED LEGGED PARTRIDGE
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It is a rotund bird, with a light brown back, grey breast and buff belly. The face is white with a black gorget. It has rufous-streaked flanks and red legs. When disturbed, it prefers to run rather than fly, but if necessary it flies a short distance on rounded wings. The red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) is a gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. It is sometimes known as French partridge, to distinguish it from the English or grey partridge. This is a seed-eating species, but the young in particular take insects as an essential protein supply. The call is a three-syllable ka-chu-chu.
EURASIAN WILD BOAR
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EURASIAN WILD BOAR Sus scrofa Jabalí (Sp), Wildschwein (G), Sanglier (F). Although a boar is actually a male pig or hog, the term is widely used as a common name for the species. DESCRIPTION (male) Shoulder height 30-47 inches (76-119 cm). Weight 150-400 pounds (68-181 kg), sometimes as much as 700 pounds (317 kg). Females are somewhat smaller than males and have much smaller tusks. A medium-sized animal with a thick body, relatively thin legs, a short neck, and a long, pointed head ending in a disklike snout. Coat is dense, bristly hair, brownish-gray in color, sometimes with cheek whiskers and a neck mane. There are no facial warts. Each foot has four toes, the middle two supporting the body, the two lateral toes (false hoofs) higher up and not touching. Canine teeth are usually well-developed, forming tusks. Upper tusks grow outward and backward; the lower ones grow upward and backward, tending to make a circle. Tusks will usually wear against each other, honing sharp edges. Stomach is two-chambered and non-ruminating. BEHAVIOR Gregarious, living in family groups, though old boars may be solitary. When undisturbed, it is active morning and afternoon, resting midday and at night. Becomes nocturnal when harassed. Eats all kinds of vegetable matter, also small animals and carrion. Sense of smell is very good, hearing good, eyesight only fair. Wary and alert. A fast runner and strong swimmer. Its habitat is undergrowth and forest, at any altitude. Requires water for drinking and wallowing. HABITAT Woodland. Also agricultural areas with nearby cover. DISTRIBUTION Most of Europe except the British Isles and Iceland. Not native to Scandinavia, but there are introduced animals in southern Norway and Sweden. For record-keeping purposes, all European populations are considered indigenous. Outside Europe, the Eurasian wild boar is also native to northern Africa, mainland Asia south of latitude 48°N, and the islands of Sri Lanka, Sumatra, Java, Taiwan, and Honshu (Japan). Introduced in many other parts of the world. TAXONOMIC NOTES While some authorities recognize no subspecies in Europe, others list as many as seven: scrofa (France and Germany eastward into Belarus), falzfeini (Poland),attila (Transylvania to the Caucasus and Iran), reiseri (Bosnia & Herzegovina), majori (Italy), castilianus (Spain), and meridionalis (Sardinia). We do not separate them. REMARKS The Eurasian wild boar is a fine game animal, alert, wary and quite dangerous at close quarters.

Hunting Lodging

Lodging

Latest Reviews ( 5/5 Stars - 5 Reviews )

Dennis Anderson

Just wanted to give you a “Big Thank You” for putting my hunt for Aoudad and the Pyrenean Chamois together. The quality of the animals I took were excellent and your hunting ability delivered results. I thank you and would also recommend you to any future clients you may engage. Look forward to a return trip and appreciate the professionalism you displayed.
2 years ago

Mike Rogers

Occasionally youth and experience combine to create a tremendous outfitter within the wolrd of hunting. Pablo Carol and Joaquin Vadillo of International Wild Hunting posses the passion of true hunters, phenominal hunting areas and the ability to guide hunters to remarkable success. (see # 1 Ronda Ibex in SCI’s record book). I had a great hunt for Roe Deer, Beceite Ibex and Pyrenean Chamois- I highly recommend- International Wild Hunting.
2 years ago

Thomas Barber

Hi hunters friends, I am a French passionate hunter, I meet Joaquin from one common Spanish friend. I hunted in the Sierra Nevada close to the beautiful town of Cordoba with him. He is very professional in both the organization of the trip and the hunt. His skills allow me to realize a dream and harvest a beautiful 11years old Ibex. I highly recommend his guiding service.
2 years ago

Jose Maria Losa

I have hunted several times with Pablo and Joaquín, and I have had great hunting experiences with them. Thank you for help and see you soon.
2 years ago

Paul Kretschmar

Muchas gracias – a big thank you for a phantastic hunting adventure for Beceite Ibex in Spain. It was a challenging, exciting and memorable hunting experience which even inspired me to publish an article about this hunt (c.f. Jagdzeit International 3/2015). The hunt was very professionally managed from the very first minute. We hunted in the beautiful highlands of souther Aragón and I was able to take a very nice Ibex. I can truly recommend the professional guiding services of International Wild Hunting and I am already planning to return for another great hunting adventure.
2 years ago

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